Community Services Resources

HSTAC has developed a range of innovative learning resources to support the delivery of vocational education and training in community and health. Some of the resources are paper based and others have been developed as multi-media products depending on the needs of the clients. These resources have been developed in partnership with other organisations and providers.


 

Children's Services Workplace Assessment Guide

Qualifications in children's services may be gained through training, through workplace assessment of existing skills, or through a combination of both.

This guide has been developed to assist people involved in workplace assessment in the Northern Territory children's services industry. These people are assessees, assessors and other children's services workplace personnel. The Guide is available online and is free to use. Click here to go to the Guide 

 


 

Get Set: Disability Service Staff Induction Kit (2007)

Get Set is an induction kit for disability service organisations in the Northern Territory. The resource is designed for use with new staff, especially Disability Support Workers. It is a free resource available on-line or on CD.

The kit supports:

  • learning about disability services as a field of work
  • and learning about the employing organisation.

What does Get Set contain?

Get Set contains a Learning Strategy comprising five Learning Programs:

  • People with Disabilities – Your Clients
  • The Disability Services Sector – Your Industry
  • The Disability Services Organisation – Your Employer
  • The Role of Support Worker – Your Job
  • Workplace Health and Safety – Your Responsibilities
  • Each Learning Program contains:
  • Facilitator Notes
  • Resources (PowerPoint, Word and PDF files)

The Learning Programs are numbered to suggest a sequence of delivery. Facilitators are free to change the sequence and to present Learning Programs and Topics in the order that best suits the agency and the learners.

Get Set also contains a Library with additional resources and an Induction Checklist.

Who can use Get Set?

The kit can be used by any person who is responsible for the induction of disability support workers. That person is likely to be a manager, supervisor or trainer employed or contracted by a disability services organisation. Get Set uses the term ‘facilitator’ to describe the person delivering the induction program and the term ‘learner’ to describe the person being inducted.

Is Get Set for use with groups or individuals?

Either. Organisations can use Get Set with groups and individuals, and on or off the job. Here are some ways of using the kit.

  • to induct a group of workers from one or several organisations

To do this, use the workshop Facilitator Notes in the Learning Programs. You will be working in a group learning environment such as a training room. When working with a group from several agencies, be sure to choose examples relevant to each agency (e.g. policies and procedures).

  • to support on the job learning

To do this, an on-the-job facilitator goes through the Learning Programs with the learner, in the context of the workplace and the organisation's priorities. The facilitator will need to select the appropriate Learning Programs and Topics consistent with workplace requirements.

  • to support self-paced learning off the job.

To do this, the facilitator will select relevant Learning Programs and topics, and introduce the learner to them, ensuring that the learner has the CD and computer access. The learner will be responsible for reading the relevant resources and completing activities in the Learning Program. The facilitator will need to provide the organisation's information (e.g. relevant policies and procedures) and check the learner's progress. It is strongly recommended that self-paced learners use a journal to record their progress and that the facilitator check the journal for evidence of learning. Self paced learning off the job is an option for highly motivated learners with good literacy skills. Use this link to access the online version of Get Set

 


 

Hear This: Supporting Aboriginal learners and employees who have hearing loss.

Hearing loss is very widespread in Aboriginal communities because of middle ear disease. Chronic ear disease leaves many Aboriginal people with long term permanent hearing loss and auditory processing problems. This can have a wide ranging effect on education and training, employment and family and social relationships. Hear This website contains resources and information for employers, educators, trainers and families. 

 


 

Skills Recognition Resource

This resource has been developed by Human Services Training Advisory Council to help employers to better understand the way that skills recognition works. Skills recognition processes are also called recognition of prior learning (RPL) and recognition of current competencies (RCC). Skills recognition is an assessment process where workers can have their skills and knowledge mapped against units of competency which make up formal qualifications. View the resource>>


 

Right on the Ground

Cover
Right on the Ground is an interactive CD that was developed in response to an Environmental Health Worker Training and Employment Initiative implemented by the Human Services Training Advisory Council (HSTAC) during 2002 – 2003. The project involved mentoring Indigenous Environmental Health Worker apprentices employed in Katherine West, Darwin Urban, Darwin Rural and Central Australian regions.  

 


 

Indigenous Environmental Health Worker apprenticeships

By the end of the project HSTAC had identified and worked through many obstacles and impediments to the successful completion of Indigenous Environmental Health Worker apprenticeships.

The project documented a range of strategies to support apprenticeships and identified information of particular relevance to employers and trainers of Indigenous apprentices. At the conclusion of the project HSTAC decided to collate this information and make it available to potential employers and Registered Training Organisations.

The CD format was chosen because HSTAC had received wide and positive feedback on its earlier Indigenous environmental health CD, the Livin’ in a House recording by George Rrurrumbu. The Livin’ in a House project showed the strength of animated storytelling as a medium to support learning and to increase the shelf life of a project.

By adding storytelling animations to an electronic information kit, HSTAC considered that Right on the Ground would be more attractive and therefore more likely to be used by the target audience, which mainly comprises employers and potential employers, and Registered Training Organisations.


 

Language, Literacy, Numeracy

A selection of the Resource Kits have been produced by Human ServicesTraining Advisory Council.


 

Healthy Housing

Interactive CD

The Healthy Housing is a Workplace English Language and Literacy Resource for people involved in tenancy support program work (tenant support workers) and those supervising or assisting them. This resource is designed to address the needs of workers who already have skills and knowledge in a related area of service provision, such as health, environmental health, population health or community development.

The Healthy Housing resource consists of two CDs.

Healthy Housing: an introduction is an interactive resource for tenant support workers. It provides an overview on key issues and skills required to undertake tenant support work.

Healthy Housing: a guide to tenancy support work has more in-depth information for tenant support workers and their supervisors. There are learning activities and supporting material that a supervisor or support person may want to draw on when assisting a learner. The learning activities are related to the essential knowledge in units of competency from the Health and Community Services training packages (see below for more information).

Key concepts of the resource

  • This resource is designed to address the needs of workers who already have skills and knowledge in a related area of service provision, such as health, environmental health, population health or community development.
  • Tenants and homeowners have responsibilities. Understanding key documents such as tenancy agreements and condition reports helps tenants to understand their rights and responsibilities. Tenants have a right to have a say.
  • Housing and health are connected. Clean, working and safe houses are vital for health and wellbeing. There are many challenges and housing issues for people living in remote communities. 
  • Tenant support workers come from various job and life backgrounds. Key skills are communication, community development, networking and understanding key concepts, documents and legislation. 
  • Developing skills, partnerships and resources is a key part of being a tenant support worker and providing tenancy support programs.

The Story: Western concepts of housing

Included in this resource is an interactive book: The Story (also available as a PDF for printing). The Story is about where Western ways of thinking come from. The idea is to give a context to the way literacy, numeracy and communication skills are used in the workplace – why we do things the way we do in Australia today.

It also explains a little about how Westerners think about housing and how that thinking has affected Indigenous people over the past two hundred years. For those from a Western background, The Story is designed to help you understand your own culture. For those from a non-Western background, we hope The Story will help you to understand why people from a Western background do things the way they do.


 

Environmental Health Worker Resource Kit

Developed for use by people who train, work with, or employ Indigenous Environmental Health Workers. The contents cover literacy and numeracy skills required to carry out practical workplace tasks ranging from measuring pesticide and water tank volumes to basic computer skills and reporting.

The Environmental Health Worker Resource Kit has been developed for use by people who train, work with or employ Indigenous Environmental Health Workers. Contents of the kit cover the literacy and numeracy skills needed to carry out practical workplace tasks ranging from measuring pesticide and water tank volumes to basic computer operations and report writing.

Numeracy, Literacy and Workplace Communication

The kit covers more than 50 topics, with practice tasks and an accompanying booklet that explains the foundations and history of public health practice.

The instructional design of the kit aims to support mutual learning across cultures, while enhancing literacy and numeracy skills linked directly to environmental health worker activities.

What the Kit contains

  • three streams - literacy, numeracy and workplace communication
  • sets of colour-coded information and practice cards for each stream
  • distinctive icons and graphics 
  • a booklet that tells the story of western medical and public health practice
  • a CD-ROM covering all kit contents 
  • a pair of reading glasses to assist with the magnification of print.

Key Features

The Environmental Health Worker Resource Kit comes in durable packaging with laminated colour coded cards for easy identification of the three streams: literacy, numeracy, and workplace communication.

  • easy to use off the job or in the workplace 
  • works well in one to one sessions or with groups
  • ideal for use where computer-based learning is not possible
  • sold free of copyright restrictions.

 

Skills for Board and Council Members Resource Kit (Literacy Resource Kit for Board and Council Members)

This resource kit is designed to meet the needs of people interested in becoming members of boards and councils. It specifically targets Indigenous board and council members, but is appropriate for a much wider audience

Who the kit is for?

The kit aims to help board and council members to learn skills in English language literacy, numeracy and communication. It has been developed with Indigenous board and council members in mind, but can be used in any board or council context. The kit can be used by trainers, mentors and members of boards and councils. Mentors may include staff of Indigenous organisations (often CEOs) who work directly with elected members.

How to use the cards in the kit

Three sets of cards cover Literacy, Numeracy and Communication skills. These sets contain Information Cards and Practice Cards. Practice Cards are printed on a white background so they can be photocopied and written on easily. Some cards contain references to a fictional community called Wonem. This is to provide context for learning.

All Practice Cards have been mapped to National Reporting System (NRS) Levels. The mapping is set out on the card titled National Reporting System Levels. Registered Training Organisations may wish to use this card to determine language, literacy and numeracy levels of learners.

If you are using a card as a mentor or trainer, you will probably start by reading the Information Card with the learner. When you get to the Practice Card, the learner may be ready to do the exercises alone or you might decide to work with them.

A fourth set of cards – Background Cards – explains key concepts used in the Literacy, Numeracy and Communication cards. Background Cards have no Practice Cards.

All cards in the kit are numbered. Athough the numbering does not indicate a sequence of learning, cards with higher numbers are usually more complex. Choose card topics or sequences that will be most useful to the learner. One card lists NRS levels of the Practice Cards.

How to use Power Words

The kit identifies ‘power words’ – words and phrases that often occur in the work of boards and councils. Sometimes they are ‘buzz words’ used in organisations. The Power Words booklet aims to demystify these words and phrases. Kit users are encouraged to make their own lists of Power Words.

How to use The Story

The Story is about why western organisations work the way they do. It tells some history, unpacks some assumptions, and provides some scenarios. Trainers and mentors who understand the history and assumptions behind western ways of doing business will be in a better position to explain their own culture, to learn about Indigenous cultures, and to work towards solutions that are respectful of both. The Story can be read, talked about, or used as source material for training and mentoring sessions.

When to use the kit

As well as in training or mentoring sessions, you might use the kit:

  • as a resource for regular activities at board / council meetings 
  • as part of induction processes and manuals for board / council members
  • as a tool when debating key issues during meetings (scenarios from The Story might be helpful)
  • as a resource when a board / council has to deal with an unexpected problem 
  • as preparation or follow-up for governance training.

 

Early Childhood Worker Resource Kit

This resource kit supports the acquisition of language, literacy and numeracy skills underpinning the work of childcare workers at entry level. The kit specifically targets workers from non-English speaking backgrounds and aims to meet learning challenges as they arise on a daily basis in the workplace; it is designed to complement skills acquisition both in the workplace and in off-the-job working environments. To be used by trainers, supervisors, managers and mentors.

It contributes to the literacy, language and numeracy requirements of Certificate III in Children’s Services CHC 30402, which is part of the Community Services Training Package CHC02

The kit specifically targets workers from non-English speaking backgrounds and aims to meet learning challenges as they arise on a daily basis in the workplace; it is designed to complement skills acquisition both in the workplace and in off-the-job working environments. To be used by trainers, supervisors, managers and mentors.

It is ideally suited for supporting apprentices and trainees in the workplace without the specific need for a LLN (Language, Literacy and Numeracy) expert, because the tasks are designed around work tasks rather than training plans.

Who the kit is for?

The Early Childhood Worker Resource Kit aims to help entry level workers in long day care and family day care to learn skills in English language literacy, numeracy and workplace communication. The kit is primarily designed for use in the workplace but may also be used in formal training off the job. Kit users will be learners, workplace mentors (such as colleagues and supervisors) and trainers.

Using the kit

Choose the topics that are relevant to the needs of learners. One or more topics can be covered in a session. Sometimes, a topic might take several sessions. Sessions may be one on one or in small groups.
Sessions can be held in conjunction with:

  • staff meetings
  • activities on the job
  • activities off the job
  • professional development sessions
  • performance appraisals 
  • skills recognition processes.

The cards

Three sets of cards cover Literacy, Numeracy and Communication topics. Information Cards are coloured. Practice Cards are printed on a white background so they can be photocopied and written on.
Some cards refer to a ‘support person’. This could be a colleague, mentor or trainer. If you are a support person, you will probably start by reading the Information Card with the learner. When you get to the Practice Card, the learner may be ready to do the exercises alone or you might decide to work with them. All cards in the kit are numbered. Choose card topics or sequences that will be most useful to the learner.

The Story

The kit contains a booklet titled The Child Care Story—How did we get here? The booklet is designed to help trainers, mentors and learners talk about how Australia’s early childhood workplaces have evolved against the background of history and childhood in different places, times and societies. The idea is to give a context to the way literacy, numeracy and communication skills are used in the workplace – why we do things the way we do. The Child Care Story is presented as a sourcebook allowing learners to explore and discuss a number of themes and topics. The Introduction to the story provides more information.
There is information about Competency Standards and National Reporting System (NRS) Levels.

 


 

Case Studies

Human Services Training Advisory Council (HSTAC) has been involved in a case study that explains how the Building Indigenous Healthy Housing Teams Project takes advantage of the current Indigenous housing initiatives.


 

Building Indigenous Healthy Housing Teams

Accredited vocational training for Indigenous Environmental Health Workers( IEHW) has been available in the Northern Territory since 1992. During this time Indigenous people have undertaken and completed vocational training and returned to their communities only to find that there were few opportunities to use their skills and be involved in meaningful employment.

This issue was discussed in the final report of Review of the Northern Territory Department of Health and Community Services Aboriginal Environmental Health Worker Program (DHCS) undertaken by the Human Services Training Advisory Council in 2005.

The limited capacity for DHCS and Community Councils to employ IEHWs has led to years of substantially skilled Indigenous people not having the opportunity to use their skills and contribute to the health and wellbeing of their communities. During this time, efforts were made to convince Community Councils and building and construction contractors to include IEHWs in their housing construction teams. This never gained any momentum because people did not fully understand the role of the IEHW and how these skills could contribute to housing teams. At that time, the fractured nature of Indigenous housing and construction initiatives did not provide the fertile ground needed for such a strategy to succeed. (The photo shows on the job training observations at the Bawinanga Training Centre.)

Developing an on the job learning environment for workers in Children's Services

'Steal small amounts of time during the day for staff to undertake professional development activities using the resource kit as a tool to build on the workers’ language, literacy, numeracy and communication skills'.
Background
In 2006 Human Services Training Advisory Council received funding under the Workplace English Language and Literacy Programme by the Commonwealth through the Department of Education, Science and Training, to develop a language, literacy, numeracy and communications resource kit to support the delivery and assessment of the Certificate III in Children’s Services. The resource kit has been popular, selling to clients across Australia. Extra funding was sourced from the Northern Territory Government to promote the resource kit and support Northern Territory clients who might need some guidance in how to use the kit in their workplaces.

In 2008 Human Services Training Advisory Council received funding under the Adult Literacy National Project by the Australian Government Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations to develop an on the job learning environment for workers in children’s services. The strategy included using the above resource kit to increase the language, literacy, numeracy and communications skills of the workers in these services.

A PDF of the case study is available for download here. This report contains examples of the information and practice cards from the Resource Kit. Please note the PDF file is 4.2MB in size.
To read more about the Early Childhood Worker Resource Kit developed by HSTAC click here >>.

The case study is published as a PDF and can be downloaded here. (The file is 590KB in size)
Download the case Study 

This photo is from the report 'Developing an on the job learning environment for workers in Children's Services'. It shows a professional development session at Little Joeys. From left to right: Terrah Bestmann (Assistant), Erin Hodgetts (Assistant), and Dahlia De Guzman (Team Leader).


 

Health Promotion

Human Services Training Advisory Council (HSTAC) has been involved in developing resources to support the work of health and environment workers in communities.


 

 Livin' in a House

CD CoverThe Livin’ in a House song and concept grew out of collaboration between Human Services Training Advisory Council, Skinnyfish Music and George Rrurrambu.

The purpose of the animated song is to support Indigenous Environmental Health Workers who do important work in remote Aboriginal communities which helps to deliver better primary health outcomes for the families who live in those communities.

The work is closely associated with the challenge of living in a new house, including understanding how everything works, and managing the living arrangement on a day to day basis.

George Rrurrambu was an elder of the Gumatj clan and an elder of contemporary Aboriginal music. He saw himself as a messenger and believed many stories can be told through song. He was passionate about people being responsible for their own living environment, and wanted this song to support the Indigenous Environmental Health Workers in Australia.

His own message was ‘grow strong’. The production of this CD has been sponsored by the Beverage Industry Environment Council.

© Copyright 2003 HSTAC.
All rights reserved. Made in Australia.
Publishing 2003 George Rrurrambu (Skinny Fish Music Publishing) & Michael Hohnen (Mushroom Publishing).

The Livin’ in a House song and concept grew out of collaboration between Human Services Training Advisory Council, Skinnyfish Music and George Rrurrambu


 

eQUIPD Magazine

eQUIPD is an annual magazine that is published for Year 10 student as career pathway.

It is a valuable tool for their future.

eQUIPD is jam packed full of interactive pages and career profiles on most of the top careers available in Northern Territory.

Read HSTAC article on eQUIPD 2014

( Please note: Documents as PDF, may take a while to open )  

 


 

Training in First Aid

Learning a new skill can be hard. But there are things we can do before, during and after training to help us learn.

This booklet will give you some ideas and tools that will help you:

  • get ready for your First Aid training course
  • participate fully in the training
  • learn some skills that will help you use First Aid
  • feel confident about being assessed.

Click here to go to the booklet  

*This booklet won’t teach you First Aid – the course will do that!